Gravalax

Gravalax

Gravalax

The gravalax is done! This is the second time I’ve made it. I learned the process from Emeril Lagasse’s cookbook. Seattle food blogger Audrey calls this cold-cured salmon.

Here’s what I did:

Buy salmon:

I buy my salmon from Tuna Dan at the Poulsbo Farmer’s Market. He catches it, processes it, and sells it immediately, often he says he’s caught it the day before. He puts it in a plastic bag with ice for me to take home.

Tuna Dan

Tuna Dan

Salt bed:

Emeril and Audrey say to debone the salmon, but Tuna Dan had already done that, so I went directly to the next step. I made a bed of kosher salt on my biggest Pyrex pan, put the fillet skin down on the salt, put more salt on the top of the salmon. I laid two sprigs of fresh dill on top.

Salmon on salt bed

Salmon on salt bed

Press salmon:

I put the next smaller Pyrex pan on top of the salmon and weighted it down with a brick (I keep a clean brick in the kitchen for pressing duties).

Salmon weighted

Salmon weighted

Chill salmon:

The weighted salmon went into the refrigerator. A day later I took the salmon out, flipped it skin-side up, weighted it again and put it back in the refridgerator. This process presses the water out of the salmon.

Salmon chilling

Salmon chilling

Rack salmon:

The next day I pulled the salmon and put it on a rack on a half-sheet pan. Back into the refrigerator it went for another day. This process further dries out the salmon.

Salmon racked

Salmon racked

Cut and eat:

It’s ready to serve! It tastes like cured salmon, but without the smoky flavor of smoked salmon. I serve it straight with crackers. I think it goes well with my dill pickles.

Others vary the spices – Emeril uses black pepper, Audrey did things with fennel seeds. I like the clean taste of dill by itself.

Links:
Eat Local Northwest’s cold-cured salmon
Farm to Fork cookbook.
Poulsbo Farmer’s Market


Comments

Gravalax — 3 Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *